Wednesday, May 11, 2011

city prepared to tackle high weeds and grass

The City of Indianapolis Department of Code Enforcement (DCE) continues its high weeds and grass program this week, dispatching inspectors to private properties that have been reported for high weeds and grass and assigning properties in violation to City mowing vendors.

Vegetation over 12 inches in height is considered high weeds and grass and is an environmental public nuisance. Property owners receiving a notice of violation have five days from the date the notice is mailed to mow their overgrown property. If a property owner fails to mow the property, the City will send a mowing vendor to mow the property and will bill the owner for the service.

“The Mayor’s Action Center fields thousands of calls related to high weeds and grass each season, and the City is prepared to tackle these property maintenance issues that can often mean the difference between a blighted neighborhood and a vibrant neighborhood,” said Mayor Greg Ballard. “This year, the City will engage several neighborhoods in the high weeds and grass program through a pilot that will complement DCE’s existing efforts and will empower neighborhoods to help protect the quality of life in their own communities.”

As part of continued improvements to the high weeds and grass program, DCE will pilot a neighborhood mowing vendor program in a partnership with Keep Indianapolis Beautiful, Inc. (KIB) and South East Neighborhood Development (SEND) this year. As contracted high weeds and grass vendors, KIB and SEND meet the necessary insurance and equipment requirements and will work with several India­napolis neighborhoods to participate and perform work on behalf of their organizations.

“DCE continues to implement improvements to the high weeds and grass program and is fully prepared this season with 20 mowing vendors and a full-time inspection staff,” said Rick Powers, Director of the Department of Code Enforcement. “Last year, DCE vendors mowed more properties than ever before, over 10,600, and we will continue to build on our past successes.”

More information about the City’s high weeds and grass program is available at